Blog

Read what we think about the latest innovations, research, and trends in the publishing industry. Be sure to check out local fun facts, too!

Destination Literature: New York City

By Lindsay Howard

My first destination literature blog post took us all the way to Italy, but this time I’m going to venture a bit closer to home: glamorous New York City. NYC has always been a go-to travel destination and is the perfect spot for a long weekend. In Amor Towles’s novel The Rules of Civility, 1930s NYC is brought to life… Read More

PSG Reads: Quick Reads We Love

By Lindsay Howard

We all have those books that we pick up and can’t put down until we finish them. They have a punchy story line, standout characters, and a writing style that allows us to read from cover to cover in a matter of days—our Quick Reads. I went around the office recently to find out the PSG staff’s favorite Quick Reads.… Read More

Best Books for Reluctant Young Readers

By Alison Bellarosa

My younger sister has always been a reluctant reader. To this day, she claims that she just doesn’t like to read. However, throughout the years I would occasionally catch my sister engrossed in a book that she had deemed “not boring.” Based on her choices, here are a few book recommendations for the children in your life who still haven’t… Read More

PSG’s Favorite Cups of Joe

By Monica Petrucci

Behind every great professional is a great source of caffeine. One of the reasons I work as a barista is for the endless supply of free coffee—I basically need it to survive. Most of the staff at PSG feel the same way, but all of us take our coffee a little differently. • Personally, I usually take mine black—hot or… Read More

Summer Night Screenings: Outdoor Movies in Boston

By Monica Petrucci

A couple of summers ago, my friends and I decided to go to a free movie screening at a park in Boston. It was a night full of fun, warm weather and great ambience. Outdoor summer screenings can be a summer activity for everyone. They’re almost always cheap (if not free) and are often family inclusive. So if you’re also… Read More

A Boston July Fourth Tradition: The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular

By Tess Renault

With Boston’s role in the country’s path to independence, it’s not surprising that the city hosts one of the nation’s most beloved Fourth of July celebrations. Every year, the Boston Pops Orchestra takes center stage at the landmark Hatch Shell to usher in a fantastic fireworks display with live music under the conducting of Keith Lockhart. Lockhart has been conducting… Read More

Affordable Art: Discount Theater and Museum Admission

By Alison Bellarosa

There is a misconception that art, specifically performance and visual art, is too expensive to see. A couple of months ago, while backpacking in Austria, I attended the Vienna State Opera with a €4 ticket. This got me thinking about all the discounted art available around me. Most theaters provide some form of student or senior discount when provided with… Read More

Destination Literature: Ischia and Procida, Italy

By Lindsay Howard

If you are anything like me, picking your next travel destination can prove to be a difficult choice. Lately, however, I have been turning to some of my favorite books for travel inspiration. Patricia Highsmith’s novel The Talented Mr. Ripley weaves the elements of a gripping crime novel with the alluring tale of a young American exploring the beauty of… Read More

Best Books for Beach Days

By Alison Bellarosa

Growing up in a beach town, I’ve spent many summer days lounging in the sand. Because of this, I was taught young to always have a book in my beach bag. Here are some books I plan on bringing with me on my next beach day. The Identicals by Elin Hilderbrand Hilderbrand is known for her stories of family-fueled drama… Read More

Making the Most of Summer… Despite Your Schedule

By Monica Petrucci

Now that another New England winter is finally behind me, I’ve been desperate to find more time to indulge in the sun. Sometimes it’s tough to actually enjoy summer weather with work, errands and other obligations keeping us indoors. That’s why I’ve crafted a list that—despite any busy schedule—will give you at least a few opportunities to squeeze in some… Read More

YA Is Not Just For Young Adults!

By Lindsay Howard

I am a 20-year-old woman and I love YA novels! Young adult literature has many qualities that make it a universal genre that can draw in an older audience. Complex characterization and plot development, strong social commentary and messages to fight for change are just a few examples. Below are some YA novels that I feel will have a strong… Read More

Where History and Literature Meet: Barter Bookshop in England

By Monica Petrucci

I took my very first trip to England last summer to visit my longtime friend and pen pal, Alex. Since she and I have similar interests—reading, writing and pleasing aesthetics—it was only fitting that she would introduce me to the coolest bookstore I’ve ever been to: Barter Books. Located in Alnwick Station in Northumberland, Barter Books is a secondhand bookstore… Read More

A Lifetime of Celtics Fandom

By Colleen Joyce

Growing up in the ’80s, I was a huge Celtics fan. With the (original) Big Three in their prime, the Celtics were perennial playoff contenders, winning three championships. But the end of that decade brought heartache for 13-year-old me when Red Auerbach traded my favorite player, Danny Ainge, in February 1989. Given to displays of teenage melodrama, I, along with… Read More

Novel Ideas for Television

By Tess Renault

When it comes to popular TV, book adaptations are in the spotlight. So if you’re a bookworm like me, there’s a chance one of your literary favorites is headed for the small screen. Be on the lookout for these adaptations of well-loved books! The Handmaid’s Tale Margaret Atwood’s bestselling novel was turned into an award-winning TV series last year. It… Read More

Boston’s All-You-Can-Eat Ice Cream for a Great Cause

By Kate Carroll

The holiday season may claim to be “the most wonderful time of the year,” but for me and many Bostonians, that distinction belongs to the first week in June. Since 1983, the Jimmy Fund has sponsored the Scooper Bowl® to raise money for cancer research and care. For three days from noon to eight o’clock, the fundraiser dishes out unlimited… Read More

Reading Up an Appetite: May the Odds Be Ever in Your Flavor

By Erin Sherry

When I think back to the most vivid food descriptions of my reading career, it doesn’t take long for Suzanne Collins’s Hunger Games trilogy to come to mind. As the title suggests, food plays a major role in the plot and is symbolic throughout the book. In the next installment of my literary recipes series, I cook up some Capitol-inspired… Read More

California Dreamin’ Part 2

By Trina Scuderi

A few weeks ago I wrote about my upcoming visit to California. It was an incredible trip, and I got to see a lot of different places. One of my favorite parts of my trip was visiting Disneyland. It was almost a two-hour drive from my hotel, but well worth the time—and gas—spent! Disneyland has two parks to visit: Disneyland… Read More

Superstitions Around the World

By Alex Belloli

You’ve probably heard some of the popular US superstitions: don’t step on a crack or you’ll break your mother’s back, knock on wood, don’t walk under ladders and avoid broken mirrors. But across the world, there are some very different superstitions! In South Korea, it’s believed that sleeping with a fan on can kill you! This superstition is so ubiquitous… Read More

Bookish Big Shots: Actors Turned Authors

By Erin Sherry

I’m always stunned when the actors who portray my favorite characters on screen are revealed as writers. We previously published a blog post about popular Hollywood actors turned poets and novelists, but the list is still growing—and fast! Here are some actors turned authors whose work I can’t wait to read. Seeing as B. J. Novak wrote for The Office… Read More

That’s A Law?

By Melina Leon

Laws are important and should always be followed, of course, but every US state has at least one law that at first reading you wouldn’t think was actually real. I gathered some of the craziest sounding laws in New England for a sampling. Republican Representative Max Abramson filed a repeal for this law after it won a contest for “New… Read More

Summer’s Most Anticipated Movies

By Alex Belloli

What are you looking forward to this summer? The warmth? The sunshine? The beach? Of course all three, but you should also be looking forward to movies! I’ve assembled a list of this summer’s most anticipated movies. Avengers: Infinity War (April 27, 2018) Infinity War has outsold the previous seven Marvel movies combined in pre-sale tickets, making it by far… Read More

Reading Up an Appetite: Stuffed Avocados Inspired by The Bell Jar

By Erin Sherry

Ever since I purchased my first collection of Sylvia Plath poems in high school, I have been absolutely entranced by the lyrical prose and verses of New England native Sylvia Plath. My copy of her unabridged journals has been loved to near tatters, and I’ve even been known to pay casual visits to her childhood home whenever I find myself… Read More

Life Swap: Literary Edition

By Trina Scuderi

Have you ever imagined switching lives with a literary character? Going on adventures, fighting villains or even being the villain—the possibilities are endless. Here are a few characters who I believe lead envious lives: • Lisbeth Salander from the Millennium series by Stieg Larsson (and currently continued by David Lagercrantz) Lisbeth is one of my favorite characters. Although she’s faced… Read More

Springtime Blooms in Boston

By Tess Renault

If you live near Boston, it may not look or feel like spring just yet (we’re getting there!), but there are plenty of upcoming events that will help us put the cold winter months behind us! If you’re feeling artsy, make sure to check out the Museum of Fine Art’s annual spring celebration, Art in Bloom. During the last weekend… Read More

PSG Playlist: Our Favorites

By Alex Belloli

Ask someone what their absolute favorite song is, and odds are they’ll have difficulty choosing just one. The staff here at PSG are no exception. I went around the office to compile a list of everybody’s favorite songs, but could only get an answer by ensuring it only had to be one of their favorite songs. With the responses I… Read More

Boston Off the Beaten Path: Some of the City’s Most Unusual Sights

By Erin Sherry

When I first moved to Boston three years ago, I was overwhelmed by how many fascinating attractions the city had to offer. But after hitting up all of the most famous sights, I soon became curious about what other eclectic spots I might be missing. Here are some of my favorite unique spots! Bodega 6 Clearway St., Boston Don’t be… Read More

Books Coming to a Theater Near You

By Trina Scuderi

It’s always exciting—and a little nerve-racking—to hear one of your favorite books is getting a film adaptation. Hopefully, 2018 will not disappoint! Here are some books heading to the big screen later this year: Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book is getting another film adaptation. Mowgli is slated to be released on October 19, 2018, and is said to have a… Read More

Patriots’ Day at the Races

By Alex Belloli

The Boston Marathon is more historic than you may think! Starting on April 19, 1897, it is the oldest annual marathon in the world, and is one of the best-known road racing events globally. It has traditionally been held on Patriots’ Day because the Boston Athletic Association, which established the event, wanted to link Athenian and American struggles for freedom.… Read More

Lost in the Stacks: My Favorite Bookshops Around the World

By Erin Sherry

I’ve spent countless hours wandering the shelves of my favorite bookstores and always carve out ample time for bookshop hopping whenever I travel. A city’s bookstores are usually what I remember most about my trips. My three favorites are located in France, Italy and Scotland. Shakespeare and Company – Paris, France This Parisian staple is easily one of the most… Read More

California Dreamin’

By Trina Scuderi

In a few weeks I’ll be headed to San Diego, California. My sister is typically my travel buddy, but this will be my first trip without her. I planned this trip a few months ago with one of my friends, and booking the trip was a lot easier than I anticipated. When we booked the trip we were able to… Read More

The Charm of Odd Pricing

By Alex Belloli

You’re doing some grocery shopping and come across a box of crackers priced at $3.99. “Why don’t they just make it $4?” you ask yourself. It’s a common question, and the answer might change the way you think about prices. Prices that don’t end with a rounded number are called odd prices or charm prices. You’ve probably noticed that a… Read More

April Fools! The Questionable History of the World’s Wackiest Holiday

By Erin Sherry

This week, people across the globe are dusting off their pranking shoes and plotting which practical jokes they’ll attempt to pull on their friends and families for April Fools’ Day. From good-humored gags to elaborate hijinks, there’s no shortage of fun to be had on the year’s unofficial day of tomfoolery . . . but where did it all start?… Read More

Reading Up an Appetite: Stir-Fry Inspired by Haruki Murakami

By Erin Sherry

Earlier this month, I shared a recipe for Butterbeer Cupcakes inspired by the wizarding world of Harry Potter. After indulging in the magic of their butterscotchy goodness, I found myself craving something a bit more savory, but no less literary. This time around, I looked to the mind-bending novels of Haruki Murakami to guide me in the next chapter of… Read More

Viva San Pietro! Inside Gloucester’s Fiesta

By Trina Scuderi

Summer is my favorite time of the year. Not just because of warm weather and beach days, but because of a celebration in my hometown of Gloucester, Massachusetts. St. Peter’s Fiesta is an annual celebration of St. Peter—the patron saint of fishermen. Gloucester is known for its large Italian American fishing community, so it’s no surprise that St. Peter is… Read More

PSG Bookshelf: Our Childhood Favorites

By Erin Sherry

As a creative writing major pursuing a career in publishing, it might not come as a surprise that books have always been important to me. From memorizing P. D. Eastman’s Go, Dog. Go! at age two to penning whole volumes of fan fiction inspired by Cornelia Funke’s Inkheart trilogy in middle school, I still carry the childhood books I loved… Read More

Shh…It’s a Secret (Recipe)

By Trina Scuderi

As mentioned in my previous blog, I bake a lot of cookies. Walnut cups are my most requested, and I’m here to share the recipe with you! The walnut cups consist of two parts: the dough and the filling. The dough requires 2 sticks of butter, 2 cups of flour, and 1 package of cream cheese. I mix all my… Read More

Striking a Chord: My First Concert

By Alex Belloli

To me, it seems like most people have been to several concerts before they hit 21. I’m a little different. I went to my first concert when I was 24. I always wanted to go, but the opportunity had never come about. That all changed in 2016. I was determined to go to a concert, and my favorite band—Halestorm—was performing… Read More

Reading Up an Appetite: Butterbeer Cupcakes Inspired by Harry Potter

By Erin Sherry

As a reader, writer and self-proclaimed foodie, some of my favorite moments in literature are when an author makes my mouth water with vivid descriptions of a character’s meal. From Heidi’s fire-roasted cheese on toast to Edmund’s Turkish delights in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the books I love most tend to be packed with decadent details that… Read More

From Big-Screen to Broadway

By Trina Scuderi

I have always loved musicals. Growing up, I would sing along to every Disney movie I owned, and in high school I joined the drama club and discovered Broadway musicals. Broadway has recently looked to a different source of inspiration: the big-screen. There have been stage adaptations of film favorites Groundhog Day (1993), Anastasia (1997) and Shrek (2001). One of… Read More

The Lure of the Lake

By Alex Belloli

In the 1970s, my grandfather started building a house with his family, including his four, then-teenaged sons, right on the edge of Great East Lake in Acton, Maine. Decades later, my dad would take his family back there every summer. The drive was 2.5 hours—what felt like a long way from my hometown of Framingham, Massachusetts—so during my early years… Read More

Craving Some Movie Magic? Reading Recommendations Based on the Year’s Best Films

By Erin Sherry

Did you fall in love with a film this year, or can’t figure out how to fill the hiatus of your favorite Netflix series? If so, step away from the screen for a while and try one of these binge-worthy books instead!  If you liked the movie Lady Bird, read The White Album by Joan Didion Like Greta Gerwig’s film,… Read More

Beauty and the Remake

By Trina Scuderi

When I was little, I would have Disney’s Alice in Wonderland, The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast playing on loop. I watched those movies so often, I’m sure even my mom could quote them verbatim.  Recently, Disney has been reimagining these classic tales as live-action; replacing animation with actors. So it was no surprise that I was thrilled… Read More

The Great Debate: Pens vs. Pencils

By Alex Belloli

The Great Debate: Pens vs. Pencils by Alex Belloli Which is better: pens or pencils? It’s a controversy that has been plaguing academia for centuries. Math teachers often tout pencils as superior due to the paramountcy of the eraser. But does the ability to erase mistakes always translate to preference? Well, here at PSG, that doesn’t seem to be the… Read More

The Hostel on Mango Street: Following Poet Sandra Cisneros to Greece

By Erin Sherry

Have you ever fantasized about meeting your favorite writer? How about serving her a plate of mountain trout, with a hearty helping of Sriracha sauce on the side? While working at a restaurant in Western New York last summer, not only did I get to serve dinner to the beloved poet Sandra Cisneros—I got to tell her about the time… Read More

PSG’s Kryptonite: The Staff’s Favorite Superheroes

By Trina Scuderi

Over the past few years, superheroes have emerged as Hollywood’s victors. Between the Avengers series, Wonder Woman and the many incarnations of Spider-Man, the hype hasn’t faltered.  Here are some of PSG’s favorite heroes! • Annette’s favorite is Wonder Woman. She’s been waiting a long time for a female superhero, and believes the wait has been worth it. She loves… Read More

Nap It Off!

By Alex Belloli

One thing got me through college with (most of) my sanity intact: napping. Whether it was in my apartment or in the library, napping gave me the energy to carry on. Even after graduating, I find a good nap to be immeasurably helpful in energizing me when I need it. There are three types of napping: planned, emergency and habitual.… Read More

Rare Reads and Expensive Editions: Some of the World’s Priciest Publications

By Erin Sherry

As a lifelong book lover, I’ve been known to rack up quite the bookstore bill, and often find self-control difficult to exercise when I’m lost in the stacks. Unique copies of my favorite books, such as a holographic edition of Haruki Murakami’s A Wild Sheep Chase and a signed copy of the illustrated Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets,… Read More

From Crop to Cup: Coffee’s Humble Brew-ginning

By Alex Belloli

I am only a morning person by one means: coffee. Until I take my first sips, I’m basically a corpse. Growing up, I always heard adults rave about coffee, but it was a phenomenon I never understood until I experienced it. Most people know why coffee boosts our energy, but not how it came to be one of humanity’s favorite… Read More

Cookie Swap: Sweet Treats at PSG

By Trina Scuderi

Every year for the holidays, I’ll bake hundreds of cookies. For two full days, every flat surface in my house will be covered with ingredients, baking trays, dough, and freshly baked cookies. It hasn’t always been such a big production at my house. It all started with one cookie: Walnut Cups. I learned how to make them from my aunt,… Read More

PSG Bookshelf: Biographies

By Melina Leon

The reality of living in New England during the winter is that it is very cold and snowy. Why not escape that reality, stay indoors, and read about other people’s lives? Here are some of the PSG staff’s favorite biographies and autobiographies. • One of Kate’s top choices is Mindy Kaling’s Why is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? Kaling narrates… Read More

World’s Smallest Penguin Wins Big

By Sarah Rush

You’re driving to work in the morning, hustling to arrive on time, and suddenly the car in front of you slams the breaks. Annoyed, you poke your head out of the window to see what the problem is and—to your surprise—you spot the tiny, paddling feet of a mother duck and her chicks waddling across the road in a tight… Read More

A View from The Mount: Visiting Edith Wharton’s Home

By Tess Renault

New England has no shortage of historical sites to visit, and if you’re like me, visiting historical homes is a favorite tourist pastime. I always try to scout out any old homes of famous writers, so I was pretty excited that Edith Wharton, one of my favorite authors, once lived in my home state.  Located in the Berkshires in Lenox,… Read More

MASS MoCA: The Mill-Turned-Museum to Visit in MA

By Sarah Terrazano

Tucked away in a Berkshire valley, the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) is one of the most innovative museums in New England—and one of the most fascinating art museums I’ve ever visited. MASS MoCA was converted from a nineteenth-century mill into a contemporary art behemoth, making the building an attraction in itself. Consisting of 26 buildings, the sprawling… Read More

Sit, Stay, Listen to Jane Austen?

By Melina Leon

Some dogs do great when left alone, but others have a harder time being without their owner throughout the day. Cesar Millan, dog trainer extraordinaire, explains that the separation anxiety your pet feels often results in undesirable behavior. It can also cause your dog to feel depressed. As a solution, Millan created a line of audiobooks for dogs. The point… Read More

Sheep Can Recognize Your Face!

By Christine Chen

The ability to recognize familiar faces or to learn to recognize new ones is a complex image process that we, humans, take for granted. Other mammals such as chimps have that ability, but what about sheep? A recent study revealed that scientists succeeded in training sheep to recognize the faces of four celebrities by repeatedly presenting the sheep with photographs… Read More

From Carpenter to Library Benefactor: Francis Buttrick

By Christine Chen

During my frequent trips to the Waltham Public Library, I noticed a plaque with the name Francis Buttrick on a wall of the brick building. Though I could safely assume that Francis Buttrick was a benefactor of the library, I was curious to learn more about him and the history of the building. Francis Buttrick came to Waltham in 1838… Read More

Create Your Own Winter Wonderland

By Melina Leon

The season is changing, and as the winter chill arrives—especially here in New England—what better way to enjoy it than to stay indoors and get crafty. Let’s bring winter inside our homes with these fun DIY ideas! A new take on classic snow globes are DIY waterless ones. Items needed include glass jars, or clear plastic ornaments, artificial snow or… Read More

En Garde! The Niche Sport of Fencing

By Bridget Marturano

When I was younger, I always dreamed of being a pirate or a knight. When I discovered the sport of fencing at age 8, that dream came true. There are three different types of fencing: foil, epee and sabre. In foil, the target area is only the torso, and you must hit with the point of the weapon (there’s a… Read More

Science and Sweets: Why Some of Us Like Candy and Others Don’t

By Christine Chen

With the holiday season upon us, many of us will indulge in sweet treats at the office and at home, unless you are someone who does not care much for sweets, a concept that may surprise some of us candy lovers! It turns out our sweet tooth has to do with two genetic variants of a hormone known as FGF21.… Read More

PSG Favorites: Video Games

By Bridget Marturano

One of my favorite ways to unwind after work or on the weekend is by playing video games. Here are some of our staff’s favorite games to play! Don jokes that Adobe InDesign is his favorite “game” because he’s so good at it. But as far as console games go, he prefers to stick to Forza and Rock Band—racing and… Read More

When Is the Movie Better Than the Book?

By Melina Leon

I think one of the surest ways to find yourself in a disagreement with someone is by telling them a film adaptation is better than the original book. Of course, it is all a matter of personal opinion, but what films make that unpopular opinion true? Here are some films I feel succeeded the books. Girl, Interrupted: The book lacked… Read More

dOGUMENTA: an Art Exhibit for Dogs!

By Bridget Marturano

This past August, an art exhibit took place in New York City. This doesn’t seem too unusual, considering that NYC is a great place for art. What made this exhibit so special was that it wasn’t for humans—it was for dogs. This unique idea formed when art critic and dog owner Jessica Dawson took her dog, Rocky, for walks through… Read More

PSG Picks: Our Favorite Mystery & Crime Books!

By Christine Chen

Halloween is over, and with it, the sense of mystery and spookiness, but that doesn’t mean we can’t submerge ourselves in a good mystery or crime book! Here are what some of us at PSG have to say about our favorite books and authors when we’re seeking suspense. • Nora loves reading mystery novels from classic authors Agatha Christie and… Read More

Glossophobia: Better Not Eat Before a Speech

By Melina Leon

Just kidding . . . it’s probably not best to make a speech on an empty stomach. But don’t worry, if you’re one of many people with glossophobia, the fear of public speaking, there are some tips and tricks to calm the feeling of nervousness—and, in some cases, nausea—before publicly speaking. This Harper’s Bazaar article gives some great advice to… Read More

Meeting One of My Heroes: An Evening with Patrick Rothfuss

By Bridget Marturano

A few weeks ago, I got to meet my favorite author—Patrick Rothfuss. He was doing a book tour to celebrate the release of the tenth anniversary edition of his fantasy novel The Name of the Wind, and made a stop at Brookline Booksmith to do a Q&A session in the store’s basement and a signing upstairs afterwards. I wasn’t able… Read More

Pok-A-Tok: A Mayan Ball Game

By Christine Chen

In my recently found passion for pre-Colombian cultures, I went to visit Chichén Itzá, a world famous site of Mayan ruins in Yucatán, Mexico. The site hosts one of the largest surviving stone courts where the Maya once competed in a ball game sport called Pok-A-Tok, derived from the Yucatec Mayan word pokolpok. The court at Chichén Itzá measures 551… Read More

The Text With No Meaning: Lorem Ipsum

By Melina Leon

Imagine randomly hitting the keys on your computer, creating nonsense words as you type. I like to imagine that is how Lorem Ipsum—the filler text that often comes standard with many digital publishing programs—started. However, it actually started with a printer from the 1500s who scrambled up one of Cicero’s works, which may be why it’s often mistaken for Latin.… Read More

PSG Reads: Our Favorite Nonfiction

By Bridget Marturano

Fall is a great time to curl up with a good book, and it’s no surprise that we love to read at PSG! This week we asked our staff about nonfiction. Here are some of our favorite titles: Nora loves In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. The first nonfiction book that she read and loved, Nora says that the story… Read More

In Sync: How Our Brain Waves Affect Each Other

By Christine Chen

Most of us have, at some point, felt in sync with a friend or a family member because of a shared experience or shared perspectives. Not only can this “feeling” be measured in oscillation patterns of electrical signals—brain waves— that occur when brain cells communicate with each other, but brain-scanning studies revealed that human brain wave patterns do synchronize in… Read More

Tired of TV? Try Binge-Reading Your Favorite Author

By Melina Leon

Binge-watching TV shows has become a popular hobby and it had me wondering if the same could be done with books. Not just reading one book after another, but reading books written by the same author. I have been reading a lot of work by Stephen King recently. This is partly due to taking a course about him for school,… Read More

For the Love of Fall

By Nora Chan

Many are disappointed that summer has come to an end. There are no more beach trips or sandals, no more s’mores by the campfire, and school begins once again. But for me, the end of the summer marks the beginning of my favorite season of the year, and it’s not just because of all the pumpkin spice flavors. Where there… Read More

Sing-Song and Ping-Pong: Ablaut Reduplication

By Bridget Marturano

Did you know that English is full of little unspoken rules? One of these strange rules happens in ablaut reduplication, which is the repetition of a word with a change in one of its vowels. Terms like criss-cross, Kit-Kat and sing-song are examples of this linguistic phenomenon. But have you ever noticed that there’s a pattern to these phrases? Try… Read More

From Candy to Chemistry: Working in a Factory Turned Laboratory

By Christine Chen

Before joining PSG as an editorial intern, I worked as a chemist in Cambridge, MA, in a six-story structure that once belonged to the New England Confectionary Company—famous for their colorful wafers and conversation hearts, and more commonly known as Necco. Back in 1928, the Necco candy factory embodied the “promising future of American architecture,” but in 2001, with manufacturing… Read More

New Season Means New Seasons: PSG’s Favorite Fall Shows

By Melina Leon

Fall has arrived and there are new television shows starting up this season that some PSG staff members are very excited for, while others are returning with new seasons that are garnering just as much enthusiasm. During this time of the year I always get ready for a new season of “American Horror Story,” but am also looking forward to… Read More

Slaying Dragons on the Weekends: Why Dungeons & Dragons is More Than Just a Game

By Bridget Marturano

I’ve always been a fairly geeky person, so when I started playing Dungeons and Dragons (also known as D&D) it was no surprise that I immediately fell in love with it. For those who don’t know, D&D is a tabletop roleplaying game that uses polyhedral dice to determine the outcome of in-game events in a fantasy world controlled by the… Read More

Zip Into Boston!

By Katy Rosen

At the start of this summer, my first time alone in Boston, I felt some mild trepidation about having to ride the subway system fondly known as “the T.” Coming from rural Vermont, it was a completely foreign concept to me. But now Boston offers an even more eye-opening way of getting around. “The Z,” a newly opened zip line… Read More

Must-See Mini Monuments

By Rachel Matthews

Some landmarks are designed to stand out: DC’s Washington Monument, London’s Big Ben, Russia’s the Motherland Calls (a sword-wielding stone woman who reaches nearly 300 feet!). But other marvels are easy to miss if you aren’t looking for them. In contrast to its towering warrior, Russia houses the smallest public monument in the world. The tiny frog statue, named the… Read More

Fiction’s One-Hit Wonders

By Karla Accorto

While authors like Agatha Christie and Stephen King have published dozens of novels, others are known for their publication of a single novel. Emily Brontë, for example, only published Wuthering Heights, and it wasn’t well received until after her death. Critics either judged it very harshly or were unsure how to react to her dramatic romance. Whether Brontë ever intended… Read More

Waltz This Way: How Dancing Can Slow the Aging of the Brain

By Katy Rosen

I did not like the dancing portion of high school theater; every dance was a painful experience for me and anyone nearby. To this day, I cannot confidently do the Charleston, but luckily all that time spent on the dance floor wasn’t wasted. It turns out even poor attempts at dancing can help your brain! A team led by a… Read More

An Intern’s Industry Insight: The Other Meaning of “Signature”

By Rachel Matthews

Picture this: you’re nearing the conclusion of a thrilling book, and you can feel three pages left in your fingers. But the ending comes more abruptly than you thought—the last two pages are blank! I used to wonder how those extra pages ended up in my books. But PSG staff members Alyssa and Don clued me in on an alternative… Read More

Austen Fancies “Fancying” and Nabokov Loves “Mauve”: Patterns in Popular Literature

By Katy Rosen

Synesthesia is generally described as a neurological crossover of the senses. Essentially, the stimulation of one sense causes the experience of another. In his autobiography, author Vladimir Nabokov wrote that his synesthesia caused his brain to conjure colors when he heard different letters and sounds. In Nabokov’s Favorite Word is Mauve, data journalist Ben Blatt seeks to learn more about… Read More

A Tale of Two Readings

By Karla Accorto

If you ever had to read A Tale of Two Cities at a young age, you probably felt like I did—a little overwhelmed and not exactly in love. I never thought I would willingly pick it up again. As a senior English major, however, I felt I had to give the popular classic one more shot, and I was pleasantly… Read More

Qwerty Waltz: The Boston Typewriter Orchestra

By Katy Rosen

I love the sound that typewriters make almost as much as I love satire. These are two elements rarely brought together, so when I started researching the Boston Typewriter Orchestra (BTO), I got unreasonably excited. Self-described as a group that combines “elements of performance, comedy and satire,” the BTO, a group of five typists, uses typewriter keys to create music.… Read More

PSG is Sweet: Our Staff’s Favorite Desserts

By Rachel Matthews

After a busy day at the office, it can be nice to unwind with something sweet. At PSG, we all have different ways of treating ourselves. Here are some of the staff’s favorite desserts. • Katy enjoys lemon squares and homemade banana “ice cream” (which is actually just blended, frozen bananas!). • Matthew is more into appetizers and entrees, but… Read More

Dogs “Speak” in Comic Sans

By Karla Accorto

Ever since I was a child, I have loved the Comic Sans font because of how much it resembled my own handwriting, even as my handwriting developed into a more adult-like form. But how did this childlike, whimsical font come into play? Initially, Comic Sans was created for a digital dog named Rover. While testing a beta version of a… Read More

Tracing History: A Literary Tour of Ireland’s Great Writers

By Sarah Terrazano

My mom and I are most similar in our Irish heritage and love of reading. We recently traveled to Ireland together and soaked up not just the cloudy countryside, but also Ireland’s rich literary history, by creating our own literary Dublin walking tour. We began with the Dublin Writers Museum. In an unassuming yet charming eighteenth-century brick house in northern… Read More

Read Like PSG: Our Reading Habits

By Katy Rosen

When I delve into a book, I like to read every chapter name before I start in. I always like to have some idea of what I’m getting into. This is a practice I sort of fell into, though I never realized the other PSG staff members might also have curious reading habits they’ve fallen into! •Alyssa’s main habit, which… Read More

See the World Without Leaving Times Square

By Rachel Matthews

There’s something oddly comforting about seeing everyday objects scaled down to miniature size. It reminds me of the days of dollhouses and army men, when I controlled my own tiny worlds. I can only imagine the thrill of seeing Gulliver’s Gate: a tiny world of epic proportions. Since May 9, 2017, visitors to Times Square could pay to enter the… Read More

An English Major’s Dream Come True: Visiting Shakespeare’s Globe

By Karla Accorto

While I have been in love with London for as long as I can remember, William Shakespeare did not capture my heart until ninth grade, when I first read Romeo and Juliet. Since then, my love for the Bard has only continued to grow. Then, this past March, I had the opportunity to visit the Globe Theatre—an English major’s dream!… Read More

Mark Your Calendars! Total Solar Eclipse to Sweep Across the Country This Month

By Sarah Terrazano

Binoculars? Check. Protective solar glasses? Check. A clear view of the sky? Check! You’re ready to watch the total solar eclipse sweeping the nation this month. August 21, 2017, marks the first total solar eclipse to cover the entire country in 99 years. Tracing a path from Oregon to South Carolina, the eclipse will only be visible in the United… Read More

Lighting Up the City That Never Sleeps

By Karla Accorto

Just across the Hudson, the Empire State Building shines as the star of the Manhattan skyline. Often lit with a classic white light, the Empire State Building is even more breathtaking at night. Every so often, however, the building can be seen sporting a wide variety of colors and images. This past April, for example, Harper’s Bazaar used an LED… Read More

Upping the Stacks: NYPL’s Long-awaited Midtown Renovation

By Sarah Terrazano

I have a tradition of visiting the public library in every new city I visit. Call me a bibliophile, but a library says a lot about its city. I’ve been to the New York Public Library (NYPL) Midtown branch numerous times, but the next time I’m in New York, I’ll have a “new” library to visit—the Midtown branch’s Mid-Manhattan Library… Read More

My Shakespear-ience: Not-Your-Average Shakespeare Course

By Katy Rosen

At seven o’clock on a rainy November night, I headed back to class to start a five-hour screening of King Lear, where my professor met me and my classmates with a bag of secret-recipe homemade popcorn. As an English major at Smith College, I was required to take an intensive course. I got the very last spot in a class… Read More

Boston Students See a Whole New World

By Rachel Matthews

Once, in grade school, I was given a blank map of the world and asked to label every country (in pen—yikes). I may have gotten a lot wrong on that test, but it turns out the map I was working with may not have been accurate to begin with! I was probably being tested on the Mercator projection, one of… Read More

PSG Reads: The Staff’s Favorite Places to Read

By Sarah Terrazano

We’re a staff of passionate readers at PSG, and when not working with words in the office, we make time to read for fun in some of our favorite places. •Kate’s favorite place to read is reclining on her porch on a warm weekend morning, but she also does a lot of reading as a commuter, where she can be… Read More

Spotlight on the Stage: the 2017 Tony Awards

By Rachel Matthews

My first theater experience was in fifth grade, when I joined a community production of Guys and Dolls. I had a tiny role, but it gave me a lifelong love of the stage. I’m always looking for new Broadway obsessions, so naturally I never miss the Tony Awards. The Tonys are up there with the Emmys and Oscars in terms… Read More

PSG Staff Screams for Ice Cream!

By Karla Accorto

For the past seven summers, I have been scooping homemade ice cream at a local shop in New Hampshire. In honor of July being National Ice Cream Month, and as the resident ice cream expert on site, I decided to investigate which frozen treats the PSG staff holds nearest and dearest to their hearts. •Ken, a native of Ohio, admitted… Read More

Fond of Fonts? Try #FontSunday, the Typeface Treasure Hunt!

By Sarah Terrazano

As a college student, I’ve been programmed to type in Times New Roman—the font most often required for school assignments. But as the Font Sunday movement shows, I’ve been missing out on a whole wide world of fonts. Font Sunday is a weekly font-spotting Twitter project spearheaded by the Design Museum in London. Every Saturday, the Design Museum tweets out… Read More

Storm Chasing in the Arctic: History’s Largest Polar Expedition

By Samantha Perry

When I think of the North Pole, I think of the harshest winter weather times 10, a wasteland of snow and ice, the glare on the snow so bad I probably wouldn’t even be able to open my eyes. It’s a no-man’s-land. But not for long. The North Pole might be one of the most important places to study weather… Read More

A Boston July Fourth Tradition: The Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular

By Eileen Neary

As a kid, one of my family’s traditions was watching the Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular on TV on the Fourth of July. Boston’s greatest orchestra plus other musical guests plus an amazing fireworks display is always the perfect way to end a New England Independence Day. Inspired by the orchestra’s compelling performances, I began learning to play the violin when… Read More

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Four state capitals are named after presidents: Lincoln, Nebraska, Madison, Wisconsin, Jackson, Mississippi, and Jefferson City, Missouri.

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